HomeCollege FootballOle Miss RebelsCFB Player Profile: RB Jerrion Ealy, Ole Miss

CFB Player Profile: RB Jerrion Ealy, Ole Miss

RB Jerrion Ealy, Ole Miss

HEIGHT: 5-9
WEIGHT: 180
HOMETOWN (HIGH SCHOOL): Walnut Grove, MS (Jackson Prep)
247 RATING: .9870
STARS: 5
YEAR: Sophomore
POSITION RANK: 15

CAREER
Rushing: 104 rushes, 722 yards (6.9 ypc), 6 touchdowns
Receiving: 20 catches, 172 yards (8.6 ypc), 1 touchdown

2019
Rushing: 104 rushes, 722 yards (6.9 ypc), 6 touchdowns
Receiving: 20 catches, 172 yards (8.6 ypc), 1 touchdown

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Jerrion Ealy Breakdown

Lane Kiffin inherits an offense loaded with playmakers and potential, and Ealy has arguably the highest ceiling of everyone. If he can get more opportunities to show what he can do, All-American honors are on his horizon, and he’s only had one year of experience.

Ealy’s athleticism isn’t limited to the football field, as he joins quarterback John Rhys Plumlee on the baseball team as well. Playing two sports in college requires a special kind of athlete, and Ealy fits that bill too. His skills on a football field are a long list, and sky is the limit for him.

As a runner, Ealy’s eager to get into space to make big plays. He doesn’t need long to get to top speed with his elite acceleration, and his blockers only need to open a hole for a few seconds for him to get through. On top of that, he doesn’t need much room to get to the second level. Some of his best highlights feature him slipping through small openings to make big plays. His vision takes him from the second level to the end zone, and helps him make ridiculous cuts.

The one problem with his game is that he’s so eager to make a play, that he’ll try to make plays that aren’t there and run right into his own blockers or tacklers. He also had competition in the backfield last year, and only one of those players doesn’t return. He’s the player with the most talent in the backfield, but there aren’t infinite touches to go around.

Outside of running the ball, Ealy is special catching the football too. He’s a natural as a receiver and doesn’t struggle hauling in the football. He also gets more touches in the return game, where he averaged 24.4 yards on kick returns. The new Rebels coaching staff should use a similar approach to utilizing his abilities, and another year under his belt will only make him better.

Joe Broback
Joe Broback
Joe Broback is a college football contributor for Sports and Fitness Digest.
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